Real-time Market Trends

Job Market Data: What Job Fields Are in High Demand?

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Written by fatraven

The Covid-19 virus has taken the world by storm, and the UK’s labour market is facing severe repercussions of the pandemic this season in recruiting for some vacancies. This shortage could be due to a lack of skills, qualification or experience; some of the prerequisites required to fill in any job vacancy.

A pre-pandemic report from Luminate(https://luminate.prospects.ac.uk/skills-shortages-in-the-uk), which takes its data from Employer Skills Survey, which talks about the ‘Skills shortage in the UK’, mentions that one-third of the vacancies (33%) are hard to fill in the UK. Some of the facts from this report are:

  1. Nurses, Computer Programmers and HR Officers top the list as there is a skills shortage.
  2. SMEs experienced a shortage of skilled people at the graduate level than compared to larger organizations.
  3. An interesting fact that strikes the eye is that the UK Labour Market is not homogenous at all, and there are regional anomalies.
  4. The main reason employers in the UK stated for not filling in some positions was the ‘low number of qualified and skilled candidates.

Skills shortage is a concern mainly at the managerial level as relevant experience and pertinent skills don’t meet the mark for the following reasons as per the report:

Why Managerial Positions Are Hard to Fill?

  • A low number of applicants with the required skills 43.0%
  • Lack of work experience the company demands 28.6%
  • A low number of applicants generally by 19.3%
  • Not enough people interested in doing this type of job 16.5%
  • Low no. of applicants with required attitude, motivation, personality 16.5%
  • Lack of qualifications the company demands 12.6%
  • Remote location/poor public transport 12.6%
  • Poor terms and conditions (e.g. pay) offered for post 12.4%
  • The job entails shift work/unsociable hours 9.8%
  • Too much competition from other employers 7.9%
  • Poor career progression/lack of prospects 3.3%
  • Lack of funding for the position 3.1%
  • A low number of suitable applicants inc. age of applicants 2.1%

Why Professional Positions Are Hard to Fill?

  • A low number of applicants with the required skills 46.0%
  • A low number of applicants generally by 28.4%
  • Not enough people interested in doing this type of job 19.6%
  • Lack of work experience the company demands 18.1%
  • Lack of qualifications the company requires 17.3%
  • Remote location/poor public transport 12.8%
  • Too much competition from other employers 12.7%
  • Poor terms and conditions (e.g. pay) offered for post 11.1%
  • A low number of applicants with required attitude, motivation, personality 8.1%
  • Job entails shift work/unsociable hours 3.6%
  • Poor career progression/lack of prospects 3.0%
  • Seasonal work 0.6%

Why Associate Professional Positions Are Hard to Fill?

  • A low number of applicants with the required skills 46.5%
  • Lack of work experience the company demands 27.6%
  • A low number of applicants, generally 17.3%
  • Not enough people interested in doing this type of job 16.2%
  • Lack of qualifications the company demands 16.0%
  • Low no. of applicants with required attitude, motivation, personality 13.1%
  • Poor terms and conditions (e.g. pay) offered for post 10.4%
  • Remote location/poor public transport 9.6%
  • Too much competition from other employers 9.1%
  • The job entails shift work/unsociable hours 4.7%
  • Poor career progression/lack of prospects 1.5%
  • Seasonal work 0.9%

Another interesting fact is that soft skills and non-technical skills are not a lacuna with associate professionals as much as it is for Managerial candidates. There are thousands of professionals who graduate every year; however, there is still a dearth of skilled professionals who can fit into specific roles.

But there is still a long way to go before the pandemic’s complete effects can be ironed out.  A new kind of ‘normalcy’ in the labour market is most needed. But many organizations need to mull about the skills they would require from a futuristic point of view, as globally, the labour market demands have changed.

As per PWC, the Local Government Association guesses that the ‘low carbon workforce‘ will triple by 2030. The need for digital skills and other transferable skills such as critical thinking, interpersonal skills, and leadership skills will become a lot more popular than technologically advanced skills.

This new era in the labour market will ensure an industry-based and worker skill-based economy. More professionals can become employable with the new advent, which will reduce the gap in the labour market.

Also Read: UK Labour Market Survey March 2021

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